The Heat Can Kill Your Pets. Take Care of Them, too!

The summer heat is bad for pets. They can't sweat like us, and they can't open the doors to get inside to air conditioning.

Food, water, and shelter are not only good ideas for outdoor pets, but they are the law.

Pets most at risk from overheating include: young, elderly or overweight pets, those with a short muzzle or those with thick or dark colored coats.

Symptoms of heat stress include

  • excessive thirst
  • heavy panting
  • glazed eyes
  • vomiting
  • restlessness
  • lethargy
  • fever
  • dizziness
  • a rapid heartbeat
  • profuse drooling or salivating
  • unconsciousness

If an animal does show signs of heat stress, gradually lower their body temperature and get them to a vet immediately.

Pets most at risk from overheating include: young, elderly or overweight pets, those with a short muzzle or those with thick or dark colored coats.

Obviously DO NOT leave your pet in a locked car. Even if the windows are cracked. The inside of a car gets much hotter than the outside temperature. When it's 80 degrees outside, the inside of the car can easily 110 degrees in only 20 minutes.

Also do not leave your pet in the bed of a pickup truck. They can face the same heat stroke risks as pets locked in cars in addition to the threat of burned paws and accidental falls in transport.

If you see a dog in a locked car, do not break open the window. You will be held liable. Instead, call the police. Get water so that the dog can start getting cooled down as soon as first responders get the animal out of the car.

(ACS) Photo: Getty/Ashley Rhinehardt/EyeEm

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